Monday, 09 April 2012 22:04

Vines, Growing a Living Screen

Balcony vines living screenVines can be used to create a privacy screen on an apartment balcony, a backyard deck or patio, or to accent a fence or wall.  Whether you have an existing structure that you'd like to see come to life, or you're planning a home improvement project, vines are an easy and low maintenance way to bring a little green to your space.

For my balcony space I decided to go with two different vines for each balcony divider, a honey suckle and a star jasmine.  These small 8-12" vines from the local nursery were planted in 23" self-watering planters.  The planters have a water resevoir below, the water weighs down the plant and makes it more wind resistant, perfect for a balcony.  For the soil, Miracle Grow Moisture Control was used, the vines were not fertilized for the first 6 months.   


Plantlings just after potting
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Vines grow extremely quickly, especially in the spring to early summer months.  Both of these plants are "full sun" plants, but seem to do well enough on my north facing balcony that only receives indirect light.  


6 months after planting, the vines overtake the lattice, and one plant even began to flower!  Plant with larger leaves is the honey suckle.

Most vines are generally hardy and require very little maintenance.  Water regularly and never let the top soil run dry.  Regular pruning is also recommended to get the vine to grow bushier.  After the oscomote tablets run out in the starting soil, fertilize with oscomote tablets every 2 months, or water-soluable general fertilizer every 2 weeks during the growing season.  

 

What if You Don't Have an Existing Structure (Lattice, Fence, Wall)? 

Create one!  We prefer bamboo stakes or pea fences.  They're economical, expandable, and highly functional.  

 

 

Questions?  Concerns?  Have your own planted vines space or looking to start one?  Discuss it here in our forums!

Read 4708 times Last modified on Tuesday, 19 June 2012 00:48

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